Faculty profiles

Members of the Economics Department

David S. Ahn

Associate Professor

Fields
Economic theory, mathematical economics
Current Research
Decision and Game Theory
Current Status
Teaching

About David S. Ahn

David Ahn came to Berkeley in 2004, immediately after finishing his PhD at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and participating in the Review of Economics Studies European tour. Ahn received a B.A., summa cum laude, in mathematics and political science and an M.A. in political science in 1999 from Emory University. Ahn's current research projects develop axiomatic theories of individual and group decision making. His research is sponsored by an NSF grant for "Models of Unawareness and Ambiguity."

George A. Akerlof

Daniel E. Koshland, Sr. Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics; Nobel Laureate 2001

Fields
Macroeconomics, Monetary theory, Behavioral Economics
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Sociology and economics; theory of unemployment; assymetric information; staggered contract theory; money demand; labor market flows; theory of business cycles; economics of social customs; measurement of unemployment; economics of discrimination;

About George A. Akerlof

George Akerlof was educated at Yale and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received his PhD in 1966, the same year he became an assistant professor at Berkeley. He became a full professor in 1978.Professor Akerlof is a 2001 recipient of the Alfred E. Nobel Prize in Economic Science; he was honored for his theory of asymmetric information and its effect on economic behavior. He is also the 2006 President of the American Economic Association. He served earlier as vice president and member of the executive committee. He is also on the North American Council of the Econometric Association.

Robert M. Anderson

Coleman Fung Professor Emeritus of Risk Management; Director, Center for Risk Management Research; Professor of the Graduate School, Economics; Professor Emeritus of Mathematics

Fields
Financial Economics, Mathematical Economics
Current Research
Determinants of Portfolio Return
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Financial Economics, General equilibrium theory (core, infinite-dimensional commodity spaces, approximate equilibria, rational expectations); nonstandard analysis (with applications to probability theory and mathematical economics)

Alan J. Auerbach

Robert D. Burch Professor of Economics and Law

Fields
Public Policy, Public Finance
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
domestic and international tax policy; fiscal policy and demographic change; inequality and tax policy

About Alan J. Auerbach

Alan Auerbach is the Director of the Robert D. Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance. He came to Berkeley in 1994 following faculty positions at Harvard, where he completed his PhD in Economics, and the University of Pennsylvania.Auerbach's current research interests include corporate taxation, population aging and fiscal imbalances, and the effects of tax cuts during the G. W. Bush presidency.Professor Auerbach, who has been honored as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, has served as Deputy Chief of Staff of the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation (1992), and has chaired the Department of Economics on two occasions.

Pranab K. Bardhan

Professor of the Graduate School

Fields
Development Economics, International Economics, Political Economy, Institutional Economics
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Economic theory of institutions in economic development; Globalization and Poverty; Political economy and the state in developing countries; Indian economic development; Issues of coopoeration and management of the local commons; Economics of Governance, Democracy and Decentralization

About Pranab K. Bardhan

Pranab Bardhan, a Cambridge University PhD, has been at Berkeley since 1977, following teaching appointments at MIT and the Delhi School of Economics. He was the chief editor of the Journal of Development Economics for 1985-2003. He was the co-chair of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Network on the Effects of Inequality on Economic Performance for 1996-2007. He held the Distinguished Fulbright Siena Chair at the University of Siena, Italy in 2008-9. He is the BP Centennial Professor at London School of Economics for 2010 and 2011.He is the author of 12 books and more than 150 journal articles, and the editor of 12 other books.He has done theoretical and field studies research on rural institutions in poor countries, on political economy of development policies, and on international trade. A part of his work is in the interdisciplinary area of economics, political science, and social anthropology. His current research involves theoretical and empirical work on decentralized governance, and the political economy of development in China and India.

George Break

Professor (In Memoriam)

Fields
Public Economics, local government policy
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Federal, state, local revenue systems in the 1990's

About George Break

Professor Break served as Chairman of the Berkeley Economics Department from 1969 to 1973. During the 1980s, he was President of the National Tax Association, which later honored him with its Holland Medal, and was appointed by California Governor George Deukmejian to the Governor's Tax Reform Advisory Commission. His advising activities extended well beyond California's borders, including work evaluating the tax systems of Greece and Jamaica.

A native of Canada who served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II, Break held a Berkeley Ph.D. and had been a member of the Department since his first appointment as an Assistant Professor in 1951. During his time in Berkeley he became a leader in the field of Public Finance and made many important contributions to this field, including early and influential empirical research efforts on the effects of income taxation on work incentives and several books and published papers on intergovernmental relations and various aspects of tax reform in the United States and Canada. Among his best known books are Public Finance (with Earl Rolph), Federal Tax Reform: The Impossible Dream (with Joseph Pechman), and Financing Government in a Federal System. Among his many students at Berkeley was Michael Boskin, Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors under President George H.W. Bush.

Clair Brown

Professor

Fields
Labor economics, management of technology
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Innovation and creativity in high-tech industries; High-tech labor markets; Status consumption and income distribution; Employment, training and wage systems in US and Japanese firms; 20th century US standards of living.

About Clair Brown

Clair Brown was educated and Wellesley College and the University of Maryland, where she completed her PhD in economics in 1973. She arrived at Berkeley that same year as an assistant professor.Brown's early research focused on employment disparities by gender and race, role of unemployment insurance, and women in the workplace. Her current research focues on the global labor market for high-tech workers, the global competitive advantage of China, India and the US in the semiconductor industry, and the impact of education and immigration policies on engineers' employment and earnings.Prof Brown is the Director of the Center for Work, Technology and Society, and past Director of the Institute of Industrial Relations. She is an Omron Fellow at the Doshisha Institute of Technology in Japan.

David Card

Class of 1950 Professor of Economics

Fields
Labor economics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Welfare reform; Immigration; Effects of Medicaid program; Pension incentives and retirement; Labor supply; Education; Minimum wages; Strikes and collective bargaining; Evaluation of social programs; Unemployment; Wage rigidity

About David Card

David Card is the Class of 1950 Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley and Director of the Labor Studies Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests include immigration, wages, education, and health insurance. He co-authored the 1995 book Myth and Measurement: The New Economics of the Minimum Wage, and co-edited The Handbook of Labor Economics (1999), Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms (2004); and Small Differences that Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States (1992). He has also published over 90 journal articles and book chapters.Card was co-editor of Econometrica from 1991 to 1995 and co-editor of the American Economic Review from 2002 to 2005. He taught at Princeton University from 1983 to 1996, and has held visiting appointments at Columbia University and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. In 1992 he was elected a fellow of the Econometric Society, and in 1998 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1995 he received the American Economic Association' s John Bates Clark Prize, which is awarded every other year to the economist under 40 whose work is judged to have made the most significant contribution to the field. He was a co-recipient of the IZA Labor Economics Award in 2006, and was awarded the Frisch Medal by the Econometric Society in 2007.

Roger Craine

Professor

Fields
Macroeconomics, finance
Current Research
Banking and finance; dynamic economics
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Macroeconomic policy; decision-making under uncertainty

About Roger Craine

Roger Craine joined UC Berkeley as a Professor in 1977 after serving as Senior Economist on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1968-1977. He also served as Economist from 1981-1982 at the Federal Reserve System. He currently is on the JEDC Board of Advisors and is a member of the IFAC International Program Committee. Professor Craine also was Special Projects Editor for the Review of Economic Dynamics from 1997-2000 and Editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control from 1987-1994. Between 1992-1997 he was a member of the International Bureau for Economic Research, and he was a member of the Council of the Society for Economic Dynamics between 1994-2004.

Jan de Vries

Sidney Hellman Ehrman Professor Emeritus of History and Professor Emeritus of Economics

Fields
Labor markets, economic history, environment and urbanization
Current Research
Colonial trade; historical market regulation; macroeconomic growth
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
European demographic history urbanization; climate and environmental history; historical labor markets; economics of art production

Stefano DellaVigna

Daniel E. Koshland, Sr. Distinguished Professor of Economics and Professor of Business Administration

Fields
Behavioral economics, Applied Micro
Current Research
Model-based field experiments; Economics of media; Editorial choices; Limited attention; Reference dependence
Current Status
Sabbatical AY 15-16
Research Interests
Job search; media economics; field experiments; behavioral finance

About Stefano DellaVigna

Stefano DellaVigna (2002 Ph.D., Harvard) is the Daniel Koshland, Sr. Distinguished Professor of Economics and Professor of Business Administration at the University of California, Berkeley. He specializes in Behavioral Economics (a.k.a, Psychology and Economics) and is a co-director of the Initiative for Behavioral Economics and Finance. He has published in international journals such as the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Finance, and the Journal of Labor Economics. He has been a Principal Investigator for an NSF Grant (2004-07), an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow for 2008-10, and is a Distinguished Teaching Award winner (2008). He was also a co-editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association (JEEA) from 2009 to 2013. His recent work has focused on (i) the economics of the media, and in particular the impact on voting (through persuasion) and the study of conflicts of interest; (ii) the design of model-based field experiments, including the role of social pressure in charitable giving and voting, and (iii) the analysis of scientific journals and in particular editorial choices; (iv) the study of reference-dependence for unemployed workers.

J.Bradford DeLong

Professor

Fields
Economic history, macroeconomics, economic growth, finance
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Comparative technological and industrial revolutions; finance and corporate control; economic growth; the rise and fall of social democracy; the long-term shape of economic history; the political economy of monetary and fiscal policy; financial crises and 20th century macroeconomics; behavioral finance; history of economic thought; the rise of the west; causes of the Great Depression

About J.Bradford DeLong

Brad DeLong is a professor of economics at U.C. Berkeley, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a weblogger at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and a fellow of the Institute for New Economic Thinking. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1982 and 1987. He joined UC Berkeley as an associate professor in 1993 and became a full professor in 1997.

Professor DeLong also served in the U.S. government as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy from 1993 to 1995. He worked on the Clinton Administration's 1993 budget, on the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, on the North American Free Trade Agreement, on macroeconomic policy, and on the unsuccessful health care reform effort.

Before joining the Treasury Department, Professor DeLong was Danziger Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Harvard University. He has also been a John M. Olin Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, an Assistant Professor of Economics at Boston University, and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at M.I.T.

Aaron Edlin

Richard Jennings Endowed Chair, Professor of Economics, Professor of Law

Fields
Industrial organization, law and economics, public economics
Current Research
Predation, Auto Insurance, Torts, Economics of Antitrust, Economics of Contracts, College Financial Aid
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
College financial aid; the provision of goods produced under increasing returns;

About Aaron Edlin

Aaron Edlin is a leading expert in economics and law, specializing in antitrust economics and law, and is the co-founder of the Berkeley Electronic Press. He has taught at Berkeley since 1993 and received tenure in 1997. He now holds the Richard Jennings Chair and professorships in both the economics department and law school. Professor Edlin served as Senior Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House covering industrial organization, regulation and antitrust. In 2004, he became co-author with P. Areeda & L. Kaplow of one of the leading casebooks on antitrust; he has also published many articles on industrial organization, competition policy, antitrust law, and a variety of other issues in economics, law and public policy. He received his Ph.D. and J.D. from Stanford, 1993; AB Summa Cum Laude from Princeton, 1988.

Barry Eichengreen

George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Political Science

Fields
Economic history, international economics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Exchange rates and capital flows, currently and historically; The gold standard and the Great Depression; The European economy, currently and historically; European integration, the euro, and the Stability and Growth Pact; Asian integration and development with a focus on exchange rates and financial markets; The impact of China on the international economic and financial system; IMF policy, past, present and future

About Barry Eichengreen

Barry Eichengreen is the George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1987. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (London, England). In 1997-98 he was Senior Policy Advisor at the International Monetary Fund. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (class of 1997).Professor Eichengreen is the convener of the Bellagio Group of academics and economic officials and chair of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Peterson Institute of International Economics. He has held Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships and has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Palo Alto) and the Institute for Advanced Study (Berlin). He is a regular monthly columnist for Project Syndicate.His books include Labor in the Era of Globalization, co-edited with Clair Brown and Michael Reich, Emerging Giants: China and India in the World Economy, co-edited with Poonam Gupta and Ranjiv Kumar, Fostering Monetary & Financial Cooperation in East Asia, co-edited with Duck-Koo Chung, What G20 Leaders Must Do to Stabilize Our Economy and Fix the Financial System, co-edited with Richard Baldwin, (e-book 2008), Rescuing Our Jobs and Savings: What G7/8 Leaders Can Do to Solve the Global Credit Crisis, co-edited with Richard Baldwin, (e-book 2008), Globalizing Capital: A History of the International Monetary System, Second Edition (2008), The European Economy since 1945: Coordinated Capitalism and Beyond (updated paperback edition) (2008), Bond Markets in Latin America: On the Verge of a Big Bang?, co-edited with Eduardo Borensztein, Kevin Cowan, and Ugo Panizza (2008), and China, Asia, and the New World Economy, co-edited with Charles Wyplosz and Yung Chul Park (2008).He was awarded the Economic History Association's Jonathan R.T. Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 2002 and the University of California at Berkeley Social Science Division's Distinguished Teaching Award in 2004. He is also the recipient of a doctor honoris causa from the American University in Paris.

Haluk Ergin

Associate Professor

Fields
Theory
Current Status
Teaching

Benjamin Faber

Assistant Professor

Fields
International trade, development economics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Globalization and development, household cost of living, real income inequality

About Benjamin Faber

Ben Faber joined the department in 2013 as an assistant professor. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and spent part of his doctoral studies visiting the Anderson School of Management at UCLA and the Department of Economics at MIT.

Joseph Farrell

Professor

Fields
theory, industrial organization
Current Research
Predation; antitrust economics; innovation; complementarity
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Standardization and network effects; lock-in; cheap talk and coordination; renegotiation in games; quality incentives; and many others

About Joseph Farrell

Joseph Farrell was educated at Oxford University, where he received his D.Phil. in 1981. He joined UC Berkeley in 1989 as an associate professor and became a full professor in 1991. He was elected a Fellow of the Econometric Society in 2002.Professor Farrell previously was Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Economics with the U.S. Dept. of Justice, Chief Economist at the Federal Communications Commission, assistant professor at MIT, a principal member of the technical staff at GTE Laboratories, and National Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board at the National Academies of Science. He was Editor of the Journal of Industrial Economics, President of the Industrial Organization Society, and Chair of Berkeley's Competition Policy Center.

Frederico Finan

Associate Professor

Fields
Development Economics and Political Economy
Current Status
Teaching

About Frederico Finan

Frederico Finan joined the department in 2009 as an assistant professor. He received his PhD in Agriculture and Resource Economics from UC-Berkeley in 2006. Prior to joining the department, Professor Finan was an assistant professor of economics at UCLA.? He is also an affiliate of Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development(BREAD), and a research fellow at IZA and National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

Richard J. Gilbert

Professor

Fields
Industrial organization and regulation
Current Research
Competition policy and innovation
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Industrial organization and regulation: particularly economics of R&D and intellectual property, antitrust policy and energy economics

About Richard J. Gilbert

Richard Gilbert was educated at Stanford University, where he received his PhD in 1976, the same year he joined UC Berkeley as an assistant professor. He became a full professor in 1983. His research is in industrial organization and regulation with an emphasis on competition policy, innovation and intellectual property. He is currently Professor Emeritus and Professor of the Graduate School. He served as Chair of Berkeley's Economics Department from 2002-2005.Professor Gilbert previously was Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Economics with the U.S. Justice Department and was Director of the University of California Energy Institute. He was a Fulbright Scholar in 1989 and was a visiting fellow at Churchill College, University of Cambridge in 1979 and 2006.

Steven Goldman

Professor (In Memoriam)

Fields
Economic Theory
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests

Yuriy Gorodnichenko

Associate Professor

Fields
Macroeconomics, Econometrics, International Economics, Development Economics, Comparative Economics
Current Status
Teaching

Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas

Professor

Fields
Macroeconomics, international macroeconomics, finance
Current Research
International financial integration, external adjustment, exchange rate dynamics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Consumption, precautionary savings, lending booms, fiscal federalism, forward premium puzzle, labor market and exchange rates

About Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas

Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas grew up in France where he attended Ecole Polytechnique. He received his PhD in 1996 from MIT and taught at Stanford Graduate School of Business and Princeton University before joining the Berkeley economics department in 2003 as an assistant professor. He is a Research Associate with NBER and a Research Fellow with CEPR (London) and the International Growth Center (London).Professor Gourinchas is editor of the IMF Economic Review. He is also associate editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association and a member of the Scientific Committee of the Fondation Banque de France. He is the winner of the 2007 Bernacer Prize for best European Economist under 40 working in macroeconomics and finance, and winner of the 2008 prize for best French economist under 40.

Bryan S. Graham

Associate Professor

Fields
Econometrics, Labor, Development
Current Research
Small sample properties of alternatives to GMM
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Social interactions, poverty traps

About Bryan S. Graham

Bryan Graham was educated at Oxford University and Harvard University, where he received his PhD in 2005, the same year he joined Berkeley as an assistant professor.Professor Graham was awarded a Macarthur Network on Social Interactions and Economic Inequality Fellowship in 2004, a Harvard University Program on Justice, Welfare, and Economics Fellowship in 2003, and a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship in 2000. He also received a Rhodes Scholarship in 1997 and a Fulbright Scholarship in 1998.

Gregory Grossman

Professor (In Memoriam)

Fields
Communist & post-Communist economies & economics, economic systems
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
A variety of topics dealing with the Soviet economy, particularly the "second economy" and monetary/financial topics

Bronwyn H. Hall

Professor

Fields
Applied econometrics and industrial organization, economics of technical change
Current Research
Innovation and patent policy; incentives, tax treatment, and financing for public and private R&D, including international comparisons; valuation of intangible corporate assets, especially knowledge assets; panel data estimation (linear and nonlinear models; count data models; dynamic factor models); patents as indicators of innovative output; firm size and growth; effect of corporate restructuring and mergers on innovation and R&D; innovation in the ICT, software, and green technology sectors.
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Panel data estimation (linear and nonlinear models; count data models; dynamic factor models); patents as indicators of innovative output; firm size and growth; effect of corporate restructuring and mergers on innovation and R&D; market valuation of R&D and patents

About Bronwyn H. Hall

Bronwyn H. Hall is Emerita Professor at the University of California at Berkeley, a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, and a Visiting Fellow at NIESR, London. She currently serves as an associate editor of the Economics of Innovation and New Technology, and of Industrial and Corporate Change. She is a also a member of several advisory boards (Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management, European Patent Office, DIW - German Institute for Economic Research). She received a B.A. in physics from Wellesley College in 1966 and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University in 1988.

Ben Handel

Assistant Professor

Fields
Industrial organization, health economics, applied microeconomics, information economics
Current Research
Health Insurance Markets, Decision-Making Under Uncertainty, Health Care Provision
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Health Economics and Industrial Organization

About Ben Handel

Ben Handel is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He is a 2015 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Economics and participated in the 2010 Review of Economics Studies European Tour. His research focuses on the microeconomics of consumer choice and market structure in the health care sector, with an emphasis on health insurance markets. His most recent research has emphasized the important role that consumer choice frictions, such as inertia and limited information, can have when assessing the welfare outcomes of different regulatory policies in health insurance markets. In addition, his work studies incentive design and adoption of information technology by medical providers. Dr. Handel has partnered with a range of large firms and policy organizations in the health care sector to study questions in these areas. He completed his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University in 2010, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2011. He received an A.B. in economics from Princeton University in 2004. 

Benjamin E. Hermalin

Thomas & Alison Schneider Distinguished Professor of Finance and Professor of Economics

Fields
Economics of organization, industrial organization, contract theory, corporate governance
Current Research
The economics of organization; corporate governance; two-sided markets; issues in bilateral trade
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
leadership and corporate culture; contract theory; governance of universities

About Benjamin E. Hermalin

Benjamin E. Hermalin served as the Economics Department Chair from 2005 - 2008. He holds professorships in both the Economics Department and in Berkeley's Haas School of Business, where he is the Thomas & Alison Schneider Distinguished Professor of Finance. He is currently serving as Vice Chair of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate and will become Chair in fall 2015. He is a co-editor of the RAND Journal of Economics and serves on the Board of Directors of the NBER. Professor Hermalin received his PhD from MIT in 1988, the same year he joined UC Berkeley as assistant professor in the Department of Economics and the School of Business. He became a full professor in 1998. ·He received the Earl F. Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award in 1991.

Hilary Hoynes

Professor of Public Policy and Economics, Haas Distinguished Chair in Economic Disparities

Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Economic inequality, social safety net, labor supply, food and nutrition programs, effects of government programs on families and children, Head Start

About Hilary Hoynes

Hilary Hoynes is a Professor of Public Policy and Economics and holds the Haas Distinguished Chair in Economic Disparities. She is the co-editor of the leading journal in economics, American Economic Review. Hoynes received her undergraduate degree from Colby College and her PhD from Stanford University in 1992. In addition to her faculty appointment, Hoynes has research affiliations at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the UC Davis Center for Poverty Research and the Institute for Fiscal Studies. She sits on the National Advisory Committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Research Program and the Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation, Directorate for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences.

Michael Jansson

Edward G. and Nancy S. Jordan Family Professor of Economics

Fields
Econometrics
Current Research
Econometrics
Current Status
Teaching

About Michael Jansson

Michael Jansson joined Berkeley as a research economist in 2000, the same year he received his PhD at University of Aarhus in Denmark. He became an assistant professor in 2001, an associate professor in 2007, and a professor in 2013. Michael is a member of the Econometric Society, Associate Editor of Econometrica, and Co-Editor of Econometric Theory and The Econometrics Journal. He received an Econometric Theory Multa Scripsit Award in 2005 and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in 2007.

Shachar Kariv

Benjamin N. Ward Professor of Economics; Department Chair

Fields
Economic theory, experimental economics, behavioral economics
Current Research
Social networks, social learning, personal and social preferences
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Networks

About Shachar Kariv

Short biography and research interests: Shachar Kariv was educated at Tel-Aviv University and New York University, where he received his PhD in 2003, the same year he joined Berkeley's economics department. Professor Kariv is the Faculty Director of UC Berkeley Experimental Social Science Laboratory (Xlab), a laboratory for conducting experiment-based investigations of issues of interest to social sciences. He is the recipient of the UC Berkeley Division of Social Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award (2008) and the Graduate Economics Association Outstanding Advising Award (2006).

Michael Katz

Sarin Chair in Strategy and Leadership

Fields
Industrial organization and applied theory
Current Research
Telecommunications policy; the economics of intellectual property; competitive and corporate strategy
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Markets characterized by network externalities; the licensing of intellectual property rights; game playing agents; contract renegotiation

About Michael Katz

Michael Katz has taught at Berkeley since 1987. He holds the Sarin Chair in Strategy and Leadership and professorships in both the Economics Department and the Haas School of Business, where he is a member of the Economic Analysis and Policy Group. Professor Katz has served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Economic Analysis in the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice; Chief Economist at the Federal Communications Commission, where he received the Chairman's Special Achievement Award; and Assistant Professor of Economics at Princeton University. He is a two-time recipient of the Earl F. Cheit Award for Excellence in Teaching and was an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow. He received his Ph.D. from Oxford University.

Theodore Keeler

Professor

Fields
Industrial organization, health economics, transportation economics
Current Research
Costs and productivity change in the U S railroad industry; economic aspects of the cigarette industry and determinants of smoking behavior; economics of regulation in the health care sector
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Optimal transportation pricing and investment; economics of regulation applied to airlines, railroads, and highway transportation

Patrick Kline

Assistant Professor

Fields
Labor Economics, Urban Economics, Applied Econometrics
Current Status
Teaching

About Patrick Kline

Patrick Kline joined the department in 2008 as an assistant professor after having been on the faculty at Yale University for a year. Professor Kline received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2007 and holds a Masters degree in Public Policy from the Ford School of Public Policy along with a Bachelors degree in Political Science from Reed College. He is the 2007 winner of the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research dissertation prize and was chosen as a participant in the 2007 Review of Economic Studies European Tour and the 2008 Frontiers of Econometrics conference in Japan.

Ronald D. Lee

Edward G. and Nancy S. Jordan Family Professor Emeritus of Economics; Professor Emeritus of Demography; Professor of the Graduate School; Director, Center on Economics and Demography of Aging

Fields
Demography
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Long-run demographic and fiscal stochastic forecasting; intergenerational transfers; macro consequences of population aging; social security; evolutionary theory of the life cycle; population and economic development

About Ronald D. Lee

Professor Ronald D. Lee holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University. He spent a postdoctoral year at the National Institute of Demographic Studies (INED, France). After teaching for eight years at the University of Michigan, he joined Demography at Berkeley in 1979, with a joint appointment in Economics. He currently holds the Edward G. and Nancy S. Jordan Endowed Chair in Economics. Professor Lee is also the Director of the Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging at Berkeley.Professor Lee is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Corresponding member of the British Academy. His other honors include Presidency of the Population Association of America and its Mindel C. Sheps Award for research in Mathematical Demography, and the Irene B. Taeuber Award for outstanding contributions in the field of demography. He also has chaired the population and social science study section for NIH and the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Population and has served on the National Advisory Committee on Aging. He is currently on the National Advisory Committee on Child Health and Human Development.

John M. Letiche

Professor

Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Monetary and economic blocs in Western Europe, Asia and North America; transforming centrally planned to market economies, with particular emphasis on the effects of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and on China; the dynamics of comparative income growth and international imbalance; monetary and economic blocs in sub-Saharan Africa; studies in the history of economic analysis. For more specific information, see Who's Who in Economics, 1700-1986, ed Mack Blang, 1986, pp 518-519

Ulrike Malmendier

Edward and Mollie Arnold Professor of Finance and Professor of Economics

Fields
Corporate Finance, Behavioral Finance
Current Status
Sabbatical AY 15-16
Research Interests
Corporate Finance, Behavioral Finance, Behavioral Economics, Economics of Organizations, Contract Theory, Law & Finance, Economics Of Institutions, Economics And Psychology

About Ulrike Malmendier

Ulrike Malmendier received her PhD in Business Economics from Harvard University in 2002, and her PhD in Law (summa cum laude) from the University of Bonn in 2000. She joined Berkeley in 2006 as an Assistant Professor, after having been at Stanford as Assistant Professor of Finance since 2002. She also is a research associate at NBER (Corporate Finance and Labor Economics) and a faculty research fellow at IZA, a CESifo affiliate, and a CEPR research affiliate. She has been a Visiting Scholar at the Max-Planck Institute in Bonn, Visiting Fellow at Princeton University, and Visiting Assistant Professor of Finance at the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago.Recently, she was named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow (2010-2012), and she received several Citations of Excellence by Emerald for her research (2009, 2006). She was named Distinguished Speaker at the European Financial Management meeting in Milan, Italy, Keynote Speaker at the ERIM Invitational Conference "Frontiers in Research in Management" in Rotterdam (NL), and Distinguished Speaker at the Mergers and Acquisitions conference in Exeter (UK). She was a selected speaker at the Review of Economic Studies European Tour 2002. She has received fellowships and grants from numerous institutions in the U.S. and Europe.She currently serves as associate editor for the Journal of Financial Intermediation, the Economic Journal, and the Journal of the European Economic Association as well as the guest associate editor for the Special Issue on Behavioral Economics and Finance of Management Science. She has been on the program committee and organized numerous sessions at the annual meetings of the American Economic Association, American Finance Association, and Western Finance Association. She also was one of the founders and is a continuing organizer of the Behavioral Economics Annual Meeting (BEAM) as well as an organizer of the Psychology and Economics segment of the Stanford Institute in Theoretical Economics (SITE).

Malmendier has received numerous honors and prizes, including the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, several Emerald Citations of Excellence by Emerald, Distinguish or Keynote Speaker engagements. She was also a selected speaker at the Review of Economic Studies European Tour.

In 2013, Malmendier was awarded the prestigious Fisher Black Prize from the American Finance Association, given biennially to the top financial scholar under the age of 40. The award citation referred to Malmendier’s work in corporate finance, behavioral economics and finance, contract theory, and the history of the firm, particularly noting the originality and creativity of her research. Malmendier’s area of focus is the intersection of economics and finance, and why and how individuals make decisions—specifically how individuals make mistakes and systematically biased decisions. Some of her work includes research on CEO overconfidence, the long-term frugality of Depression “babies” and the decision-making behind gym membership.

Daniel L. McFadden

E. Morris Cox Professor Emeritus of Economics; Nobel Laureate 2000

Fields
Econometrics
Current Research
Economics of aging: savings behavior, demographic trends, housing mobility, dynamics of health and mortality; consumer demand analysis using psychometric data; simulation methods in econometrics
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Latent variable models; choice models and applications; large sample econometrics; sampling theory; production theory; consumer theory

About Daniel L. McFadden

Daniel L. McFadden is the E. Morris Cox Professor of Economics and Director of the Econometrics Laboratory. He is the 2000 Nobel Laureate in Economics for his work in econometric methods for studying behavioral patterns in individual decision-making. Following the completion of his PhD in 1962 at the University of Minnesota, Professor McFadden went to the University of Pittsburgh as a Mellon postdoctoral fellow. The following year, he joined UC Berkeley's economics department. In 1979, Professor McFadden moved to the economics faculty at MIT, and in 1991 he returned to UC Berkeley. Among his many awards and honors, Professor McFadden received the John Bates Clark Medal from the American Economics Association in 1975; he was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1977 and to the National Academy of Science in 1981; in 1985 he delivered the Jahnsson Foundation Lectures in Helsinki, Finland; in 1986 he won the Frisch Medal from the Econometrics Society, and in 2000 he received the Nemmers Prize in Economics from Northwestern University.

Edward Miguel

Oxfam Professor in Environmental and Resource Economics

Fields
Development Economics
Current Research
Long-run impacts of child health investments; Research transparency methods in social science research; Links between extreme climate and violent conflict.
Current Status
Sabbatical AY15-16
Research Interests
African economic development, including work on the economic causes and consequences of violence; the impact of ethnic divisions on local collective action; and interactions between health, education, environment, and productivity for the poor.

About Edward Miguel

Edward Miguel is the Oxfam Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics and Faculty Director of the Center for Effective Global Action at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 2000

He earned S.B. degrees in both Economics and Mathematics from MIT, received a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, where he was a National Science Foundation Fellow, and has been a visiting professor at Princeton University and Stanford University.
Ted's main research focus is African economic development, including work on the economic causes and consequences of violence; the impact of ethnic divisions on local collective action; and interactions between health, education, environment, and productivity for the poor. He has conducted field work in Kenya, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, and India. Ted is a Faculty Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, has served as Associate Editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics and Journal of Development Economics, is a recipient of the 2005 Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and winner of the 2005 Kenneth J. Arrow Prize awarded annually by the International Health Economics Association for the Best Paper in Health Economics.
Ted is a recipient of the 2012 U.C. Berkeley campus-wide Distinguished Teaching Award, the Best Graduate Adviser Award in the Berkeley Economics Department, and has served on over 70 completed doctoral dissertation committees. 
He co-founded the Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA) in 2007 and serves as Faculty Director. He has served as the Co-organizer (with Dan Posner of UCLA) of the Worklng Group in African Political Economy (WGAPE) since 2002. Ted is also the co-founder and Faculty Director of the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS). 
Miguel has written two books, Africa's Turn? (MIT Press 2009), and, with Ray Fisman, Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence and the Poverty of Nations (Princeton University Press 2008). Economic Gangsters has been translated into ten languages, and the New York Times' Nicholas Kristof praises it as "smart and eminently readable". Miguel's other writing has appeared in Foreign Affairs, Forbes, and the New York Times.

Enrico Moretti

Michael Peevey and Donald Vial Professor of Economics

Current Status
Sabbatical AY 15-16
Research Interests
Labor Economics and Urban Economics

About Enrico Moretti

Enrico Moretti is the Michael Peevey and Donald Vial Professor of Economics. He serves as the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Economic Perspectives and is a Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. He is also Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (London) and the Institute for the Study of Labor (Bonn). 

Professor Moretti’s research covers the fields of labor economics, urban economics and regional economics.  He has received several awards and honors, including the Society of Labor Economists’ Rosen Prize for outstanding contributions to labor economics, the Carlo Alberto Medal, the IZA Young Labor Economist Award and a Fulbright Fellowship. His book, “The New Geography of Jobs” was awarded the William Bowen Prize by Princeton University for the most important contribution toward understanding public policy and the labor market.

His research has been covered by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Forbes, The Atlantic, Businessweek, The Economist, The New Republic, CNN, PBS and NPR. 

John Morgan

Professor

Fields
Theory, industrial organization, contracts
Current Research
Information and organizational design; pricing in online markets; auctions: theory and experiments; experiments in group dynamics; private provision of public goods; contests and tournaments
Current Status
Teaching

About John Morgan

John Morgan is the Gary and Sherron Kalbach Professor of Entrepreneurship. He is a director of the Fisher Information Technology Center and the Experimental Social Sciences Laboratory (Xlab). Prior to coming to Berkeley, John was a professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He earned his PhD and MS from the Pennsylvania State University as well as earning a BS (summa cum laude) at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Morgan is an editor for the Berkeley Electronic Journals for Theoretical Economics. He is also an associate editor at Management Science and Economic Theory and a member of the editorial board for the California Management Review. His most recent consulting experience is in the area of auctions and dynamic pricing for Google, Digonex, and Paging Systems. He has received awards from the National Science Foundation, and he was selected as a visiting scholar at the Hoover Institution and the International Monetary Fund. His research on online pricing earned him a best paper award for 2004 in Journal of Industrial Economics. His article "Price Dispersion in the Large and in the Small: Evidence from an Internet Price Comparison Site" won the Journal of Industrial Economics "best article" prize, 2005. His class on game theory is one of the most popular at the Haas School of Business. John was a finalist for the Earl F. Cheit teaching award in 2003.

Maurice Obstfeld

Class of 1958 Professor of Economics

Fields
International economics, macroeconomics, monetary economics
Current Research
Dynamic open-economy models with nominal rigidities, exchange rates and international financial crises, global capital-market integration in historical perspective, monetary policy in open economies
Current Status
On Leave: AY 15-16
Research Interests
Foreign exchange intervention, intertemporal approach to the current account, dynamic consistency in economic policy, credibility of exchange rate regimes, European monetary integration

About Maurice Obstfeld

Maurice Obstfeld is the Class of 1958 Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for International and Development Economic Research (CIDER). He joined Berkeley in 1989 as a professor, following appointments at Columbia (1979-1986) and the University of Pennsylvania (1986-1989). He was also a visiting professor at Harvard between 1989 and 1991. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in 1979.Professor Obstfeld serves as honorary advisor to the Bank of Japan's Institute of Monetary and Economic Studies. Among Professor Obstfeld's honors are the Carroll Round Keynote Lecture, Woodward Lecture, and Bernhard Harms Prize and Lecture in 2004. Professor Obstfeld is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is active as a research Fellow of CEPR, a research associate at NBER, and an International Research Fellow at the Kiel Institute of World Economics.

Martha L. Olney

Adjunct Professor

Fields
Economic history, macroeconomics, economics of discrimination
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Consumer spending; consumer indebtedness; Great Depression; race and credit and saving; rise of services

About Martha L. Olney

Martha Olney joined Berkeley's Economics Department in 1991 as a Research Associate at the Institute of Business and Economic Research. She was a visiting associate professor from 1993 to 2002, when she became an adjunct professor. She currently serves as Chair of the Department's Undergraduate Committee. Professor Olney has been an organizer and host of the Economic History Lunches for graduate students and faculty since 1996. Prior to joining Berkeley, she was an associate professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she had taught since 1984. She has also taught at Stanford University (2001) and Siena College (2011-2012). She received her PhD from Berkeley in 1985. Professor Olney is the recipient of UC Berkeley's Faculty Award for Outstanding Mentorship of GSIs (2014-2015); UC Berkeley's Distinguished Teaching Award (2002-2003); the Economic History Association's Jonathan Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching Economic History (1997); and the Distinguished Teaching Award, University of Massachusetts (1990-1991). She was selected as a "Great Teacher in Economics" by the Stavros Center for Economic Education in 2007. She is a member of the American Economic Association, Business History Conference, Cliometric Society, Committee for the Status of Women in the Economics Profession, Economic History Association, and the Social Science History Association. She previously served on the board of the AEA's Committee for the Status of Women in the Economics Profession and on the academic advisory board of the Financial Services Research Program of George Washington University.  She currently serves on the board of the Business History Conference.

Demian Pouzo

Assistant Professor

Fields
Econometrics, Macroeconomics
Current Status
Teaching

About Demian Pouzo

Demian Pouzo joined the Berkeley faculty in 2009 as an assistant professor after receiving his PhD in Economics from NYU. He also holds an MA and BA in Economics from Universidad Torcuato Di Tella (Argentina). Pouzo's current research interests include theoretical econometrics and macroeconomics.

James L. Powell

George Break and Helen Schnacke Break Distinguished Professor of Economics

Fields
Econometrics, statistical modeling
Current Research
Limited dependent variables, endogenous regressors, panel data
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Semiparametric and nonparametric estimation

About James L. Powell

James Powell joined the Berkeley faculty in 1993 as a professor. He received his PhD from Stanford in 1982, the same year he became an assistant professor at M.I.T, where he taught until 1985. Prior to coming to Berkeley, he also taught at Carnegie-Mellon University, University of Wisconsin, Madison, University of Chicago, and Princeton University. He has served as associate editor of Econometrica, the Journal of Econometrics, and the International Economic Review, and he was co-chair of the NSF-NBER Conferences on Econometrics and Mathematical Economics. Professor Powell's honors include: Member, American Academy of Arts & Sciences; Fellow, Econometric Society; Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences; Fellow, Journal of Econometrics; and Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship.

John M. Quigley

Professor (In Memoriam)

Fields
Public Economics, public policy, urban economics
Current Research
Integration of mortgage and financial markets; urban externalities and spatial economics; intergovernmental fiscal relations
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Housing market discrimination and homeownership; municipal bonds; residential energy market

About John M. Quigley

John M. Quigley is the I. Donald Terner Distinguished Professor of Economics. He also holds appointments in the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Haas School of Business and is the Director of the Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy. Professor Quigley is a Fellow of the Regional Science Association and the Homer Hoyt Institute. In 2006, he was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. He is the recipient of many scholarly awards, for example, the George Bloom Award for Contributions to Urban Economics.Prior to coming to Berkeley, Professor Quigley taught at Yale University. He holds academic degrees from the U.S. Air Force Academy, the University of Stockholm, and Harvard University. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Royal Institute Of Technology.

Michael Reich

Professor of the Graduate School; Director, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

Fields
Labor economics, political economy
Current Research
Dynamic models of low-wage labor markets. Economics of living wages and minimum wages.
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Minimum wages and living wages, labor market segmentation, low wage labor markets.

About Michael Reich

Michael Reich is Professor of Economics and Director of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at the University of California at Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard. His research publications cover numerous areas of labor economics and political economy, including the economics of racial inequality, the analysis of labor market segmentation, historical stages in U.S. labor markets and social structures of accumulation, high performance workplaces, union-management cooperation and Japanese labor-management systems.
 
His publications include 14 books and monographs, including Labor Market Segmentation and Labor Mobility, 2009, Labor in the Era of Globalization, co-edited with Clair Brown and Barry Eichengreen, 2010, and Contemporary Capitalism and Its Crises, co-edited with Terence McDonough and David Kotz, 2010. He has also published over 100 papers, including “Minimum Wages Across State Borders,” with Arindrajit Dube and William Lester, Review of Economics and Statistics, 2010, “Do Minimum Wages Really Reduce Teen Employment?”with Sylvia Allegretto and Arindrajit Dube, Industrial Relations, 2011 and “High Unemployment after the Great Recession: Why? What Can We Do?” Estudios de Economia Aplicada, 2012.
 

Andres Rodriguez-Clare

Edward G. and Nancy S. Jordan Professor of Economics

Fields
International Trade, Development Economics, Macroeconomics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Gains from trade; economic growth; multinational production and technology diffusion; industrial policy

About Andres Rodriguez-Clare

Rodríguez-Clare is a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, director of the Trade Research Programme at the International Growth Centre, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

He received his Ph.D. at Stanford University in 1993. He was Associate Professor of Business Economics at the University of Chicago before moving to Costa Rica to serve as Chairman of the Council of Presidential Advisors from 1998 to 2002. He was Visiting Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government in 2002 and the M.I.T. Department of Economics in 2005, and Senior Research Economist at the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank from 2002 to 2005. In 2005 he became professor of economics at Pennsylvania State University, where he stayed until 2011, the year he joined the Berkeley faculty.

Gérard Roland

E. Morris Cox Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science

Fields
Political economics, comparative and institutional economics
Current Research
Institutions and development, culture and economics, political institutions and economic outcomes, reforms in China and North Korea, European Parliament and European institutions
Current Status
Teaching

About Gérard Roland

Gérard Roland joined the Berkeley faculty as a professor in 2001. He received his PhD from Universite Libre de Bruxelles in 1988 and taught there from 1988-2001. Professor Roland is also a CEPR research fellow, where he was program director between 1995 and 2006. He serves as editor of the Journal of Comparative Economics, and was an associate editor for several other journals.Among Professor Roland's awards and honors are recipient of the Medal of the University of Helsinki, Officier de l'Ordre de Leopold II, and entry in "Who's Who in the World," "Who's Who in America," and Who's Who in Economics since 1776." He was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in Behavioral Sciences in Stanford in 1998-1999. He was program chair of the Fifth Nobel symposium in Economics devoted to the Economics of Transition in 1999. He was named Jean Monnet Professor at Universite Libre de Bruxelles in 2001 and received an Honorary Professorship of Renmin University of China in 2002.

Christina D. Romer

Class of 1957-Garff B. Wilson Professor of Economics

Fields
Economic history, macroeconomics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
The effects of fiscal policy; identification of monetary shocks; the determinants of American macroeconomic policy; changes in short-run fluctuations over the 20th century; causes of the Great Depression.

About Christina D. Romer

Christina Romer is the Class of 1957-Garff B. Wilson Professor of Economics. She joined the Berkeley faculty in 1988 and was promoted to full professor in 1993. Professor Romer is co-director of the Program in Monetary Economics at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and is a member of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award at the University of California, Berkeley. She has received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. She has served as vice president and a member of the executive committee of the American Economic Association. Prior to her appointment at Berkeley, she was an assistant professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University from 1985-1988. She received her Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1985.

David H. Romer

Herman Royer Professor of Political Economy

Fields
Macroeconomics, monetary economics
Current Research
Monetary policy; economic growth; political economy
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Microeconomic foundations of Keynesian economics; inflation; monetary economics; stock market volatility

About David H. Romer

David H. Romer is the Herman Royer Professor of Political Economy. He joined the Berkeley faculty in 1988 and was promoted to full professor in 1993. Professor Romer is co-director of the Program in Monetary Economics at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and is a member of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In addition, he is a member of the American Economic Association Executive Committee, a three-time recipient of Berkeley's Graduate Economic Association's distinguished teaching and advising awards, and the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship. Prior to his appointment at Berkeley, he was assistant professor at Princeton University from 1985-1988. He received his Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1985.

Thomas J. Rothenberg

Professor

Fields
Econometrics
Current Research
Inference in nonstationary time-series models; second order efficiency of tests
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
parameter identification and estimation in simultaneous equations models; asymptotic approximation theory

Jesse Rothstein

Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics

Fields
Labor economics, public economics
Current Research
Unemployment insurance; teacher quality.
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Economics of education; local public finance; school and teacher accountability and performance measurement; discrimination; inequality; affirmative action; black-white gaps in educational and economic outcomes; tax and transfer policy.

About Jesse Rothstein

Jesse Rothstein is an associate professor of public policy and economics. He joined the Berkeley faculty in 2009. He spent the 2009-10 academic year in public service, first as Senior Economist at the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers and then as Chief Economist at the U.S. Department of Labor. Earlier, he was assistant professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. in economics from UC Berkeley in 2003.

Daniel Rubinfeld

Robert L. Bridges Professor Emeritus of Law, Professor Emeritus of Economics

Fields
Law and Economics, Antitrust policy, Public Economics
Current Research
Federalism, economics of litigation, antitrust
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Political economy of federalism, state and local public economics, economics of the legal process

About Daniel Rubinfeld

Daniel Rubinfeld is Professor of Economics and Robert L. Bridges Professor of Law. He has held joint appointments in the Economics Department and at Berkeley Law School since he joined Berkeley's faculty in 1983 as a professor. He also is a past president of the American Law and Economics Association. Professor Rubinfeld was chair of the Jurisprudence and Social Policy (JSP) program from 1987 to 1990 and was the associate dean and chair of the JSP program from 1998 to 2000. He has also served as deputy assistant attorney general for antitrust in the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as in various capacities with the President's Council of Economic Advisors, the National Academy of Sciences, the Urban Institute, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has received a Guggenheim fellowship and an honorary doctorate from the University of Basel.

Emmanuel Saez

Chancellor's Professorship of Tax Policy and Public Finance, Director, Center for Equitable Growth

Fields
Public Economics
Current Research
Dynamics of income inequality; retirement plan decisions; capital income taxation
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Behavioral responses to taxation; optimal income taxation; social insurance

About Emmanuel Saez

Emmanuel Saez is the Director of the Center for Equitable Growth at the University of California at Berkeley. He received his PhD in Economics from MIT in 1999. He was Assistant Professor of Economics at Harvard University from 1999 to 2002, before joining the faculty at UC Berkeley in 2002. He is currently editor of the Journal of Public Economics and co-director of the Public Policy Program at CEPR. He was awarded the John Bates Clark medal of the American Economic Association in 2009. His main areas of research are centered around taxation, redistribution, and inequality, both from a theoretical and empirical perspective.

Benjamin Schoefer

Assistant Professor

Fields
Macroeconomics, Labor Economics, Corporate Finance
Current Status
Teaching

Suzanne Scotchmer

Professor (In Memoriam)

Fields
Economic theory, industrial organization, law and economics
Current Research
Innovation; Law & Economics; Group formation in general equilibrium
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Club theory; rules of evidence; evolutionary game theory; cooperative game theory

About Suzanne Scotchmer

Suzanne Scotchmer is Professor of Economics, Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. Her main academic interest at the moment is the economics, policy and law of innovation, including intellectual property. She also maintains an interest in economic theory and game theory, in which she has also published widely. Her graduate degrees are in economics and statistics. She has held visiting and teaching appointments in the economics departments of Harvard University, U.C.L.A., University of Southern California, New School of Economics, Moscow, Stockholm School of Economics, University of Auckland, University of Cergy-Pontoise (Paris), Tel Aviv University, University of Paris I (Sorbonne), and in the law schools of New York University, University of Toronto, University of Southern California, and U.C.L.A. She has also held research fellowships at Yale University and Stanford University. She has served on committees of the National Research Council (National Academies of Sciences), is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and serves, or has served, on several boards, including the Toulouse School of Economics and the American Law and Economics Association. She is currently a member of the 2010 program committee of the American Economic Association. The Department of Justice Antitrust Division has used her as a consultant on antitrust matters; and she has been a scholar in residence at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. In 2004 she published /Innovation and Incentives/ with MIT Press.

Chris Shannon

Richard and Lisa Steiny Professor of Economics, Professor of Mathematics

Fields
Economic theory, mathematical economics
Current Status
Teaching

Carl Shapiro

Transamerica Professor of Business Strategy

Fields
Industrial organization
Current Research
Dynamic rivalry, intellectual property
Current Status
Sabbatical AY15-16
Research Interests
Consumer protection, reputation

About Carl Shapiro

Carl Shapiro is Professor of Economics and the Transamerica Professor of Business Strategy at the Haas School of Business. He also is Director of the Institute of Business and Economic Research. He earned his Ph.D. in Economics at M.I.T. in 1981, taught at Princeton University during the 1980s, and has been at Berkeley since 1990. He has been Editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives and a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, among other honors. Professor Shapiro served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Economics in the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice during 1995-1996. He founded the Tilden Group, and is now a Senior Consultant with Charles River Associates, an economic consulting company. He has consulted extensively for a wide range of private clients as well as for the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission.

David Sraer

Assistant professor

Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Financial Economics, Behavioral Finance, Behavioral Economics, Economics of Organization, Entrepreneurship

About David Sraer

DAVID SRAER received his B.S. in applied mathematics and economics from École Polytechnique in France in 2001 and his Ph.D. in economics from the Toulouse School of Economics in 2007. He is currently an associate editor for the Journal of the European Economic Association and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Before coming to Berkeley, he was an assistant professor of economics at Princeton University, where he was awarded the Jacob Viner preceptorship.

Philipp Strack

Assistant Professor

Fields
Economic Theory, Behavioral Economics
Current Status
Teaching

Kenneth E. Train

Adjunct Professor

Fields
Applied econometrics, regulation
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Public utility regulation, energy conservation, telecommunications, transportation, discrete choice methods, simulation methods for estimation

About Kenneth E. Train

Kenneth Train joined the Berkeley faculty in 1979. He received his BA from Harvard in 1973 and PhD from Berkeley in 1977. He is currently an Adjunct Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Berkeley and also Vice President of the National Economic Research Associates. He has served on the editorial boards of six journals, the Research Advisory Board of the National Regulatory Research Institute, and the Board of Directors of the International Telecommunications Society. For seven years, he chaired Berkeley's Center for Regulatory Policy. Currently, he serves on the Board of Advice for the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies at the University of Sydney and on the Editorial Boards of Foundations and Trends in Econometrics and Quantitative Marketing and Economics. He has testified as an expert witness in regulatory proceedings and several prominent court cases.Professor Train has won numerous awards for his teaching and research. In 2002, he won the award for Best Energy Journal Paper from the International Association of Energy Economists. He also won the Richard Stone Prize in Applied Econometrics for best article in the 2000 and 2001 issues of Journal of Applied Econometrics, and the Award for Best Paper, Advanced Research Techniques Forum, American Marketing Association, 2000. He has received teaching awards from the Graduate Economics Association, the Graduate School of Public Policy, and the Undergraduate Economics Association.

Laura D. Tyson

Class of 1939 Professor of Economics and Business Administration

Fields
Comparative economic systems, economic development and planning, international trade, econometrics
Current Research
Changes in the international economy with special focus on high-technology competition; changes in US trade policy and US-Japan relations; US industrial and technology policies as they affect the competitiveness of US companies; economic developments and opportunities in Eastern Europe
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Economics of competitiveness; dynamics of trade and employment; trade conflict in high technology industries; economies of Eastern Europe

Lloyd Ulman

Professor

Fields
Labor Economics
Current Status
Emeritus (In Memoriam)
Research Interests
Wage determination and trade unionism; labor market analysis and internal labor markets

Hal Varian

Class of 1944 Professor; Professor of Emeritus Business Administration and Information Management and Systems

Fields
Information technology, economics of information technology
Current Research
Technology strategy and policy
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Industrial organization, public economics, finance, econometrics

Christopher Walters

Assistant Professor

Fields
Labor Economics, Applied Econometrics
Current Research
School choice; school effectiveness; early childhood interventions
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Economics of education; human capital; discrete choice modeling; program evaluation

About Christopher Walters

Christopher Walters joined the economics department as an assistant professor after receiving his PhD in economics from MIT in 2013. He received a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship in 2012. In 2008, he graduated with a BA in eco­nom­ics and phi­los­o­phy from the University of Virginia and received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

Benjamin N. Ward

Professor Emeritus

Fields
Comparative Economic Systems, Philosophy and Methodology of Economics
Current Status
Emeritus

About Benjamin N. Ward

Benjamin N. Ward taught for 32 years in the Economics Department at UC Berkeley and also received his Bachelor's and PhD degrees from there. His teaching covered 36 years, including two years as an Assistant Professor at Stanford and two years abroad in Greece and Hong Kong. He retired in 1992.

Ward had two main research fields: Comparative Economic Systems, and Philosophy and Methodology of Economics. The first of these is a rather broad field, and led him into a range of research, from worker management in Yugoslavia (Illyria, 1958; Worker's Management, 1957) through modelling of socialist economic structures (Soc.Ec. 1967), the use of mathematical techniques in Soviet Russian planning (LP, 1967), comparative development (Yug.Ec.Hist., 1978; Grk.Reg.Dev., 1962; ChiEc.Dev., 1980), and economic planning in the West (Natl.Econ.Plan.Eur, 1975). He served as Director of the Department's program on the Greek economy, as Chair of the Center for Slavic and East European Studies, and spent a year in Hong Kong initiating a UC Berkelely master's degree program in Chinese studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He was President of the Comparative Economics Association, and served as Principal Investigator for a Macarthur grant supporting both faculty research and graduate fellowships in interdisciplinary national security studies (5 years, $1 million).

Ward produced two books in his second field, Philosophy and Methodology, and is nearing completion of a third. The first of these (What'sWrong, 1972), focused on the way in which well-defined puzzles and social and career pressures give institutional structure to the field. The second (Ideal Worlds,1979), focused on the substantial role of ideology--liberal, conservative, and radical, in shaping economic research. The third emphasizes uncertainty and risk-seeking behavior as systematically underestimated by the discipline. A paper (LEP, 1988) offers an alternative way of appraising the results of economic activity, which is developed further in the book on uncertainty and risk-seeking.

It is unusual for someone who chose breadth over depth to survive in a major research university like UC-Berkeley. However it's quite natural for such a person to have a strong interest in teaching. Ward did regularly teach a variety of graduate courses in the Economics Department (Comparative Economic Systems, European Economic History, Political Economics, National Economic Planning), but was especially drawn to undergraduates who were not planning a career as an economist. The more energetic among them will likely be among the movers and shakers of the next generation, and teaching them was a delight.

 

Selected Publications:

The Socialist Economy, A Study of Organizational Alternatives, 1967, Random House.

What's Wrong With Economics? 1972, Basic Books

The Ideal Worlds of Economics, 1979, Basic Books

Problems of Greek Regional Development, 1962, Center of Economic Research monograph series, Athens.

(With George W. Breslauer & Harry Kreisler) Beyond the Cold War: Conflict and Cooperation in the Third World, UC Berkeley International and Area Studies 1991

Articles and Contributions to Books:

"Firm in Illyria: Market Syndicalism," The American Economic Review, Vol 48 #4 (Sept 1958), pp 566-589.

"Worker's Management in Yugoslavia," Journal of Political Economy, LXV #5, Oct. 1957

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(With Douglas Pike), "Losing and Winning: Korea and Vietnam as Success Stories," Washington Quarterly vol.10 #3, Sept. 1987, pp 77-85.

In Draft:

Dionysian Economics (2014)

Oliver E. Williamson

Edgar F. Kaiser Professor Emeritus of Business, Economics, and Organization; Nobel Laureate 2009

Fields
Economics of institutions, law & economics
Current Research
The lens of contract (private ordering), economics in real time
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Transaction cost economics, the governance of contractual relations, bureaucracy, antitrust and regulation

Glenn A. Woroch

Adjunct Professor

Fields
Industrial organization, regulation, telecommunications economics
Current Research
Empirical measurement of entry, convergence of telecommunications services, antitrust policy toward network industries, innovation in component products
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Design of regulatory policy, local telephone competition, network economics, empirical studies of entry, exclusionary practices, technology races

Danny Yagan

Assistant Professor

Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Capital. Taxes. Labor.

About Danny Yagan

Danny Yagan is an assistant professor of economics in the department and a faculty research fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He joined the department after earning a BA summa cum laude and a PhD in economics from Harvard University and after completing a post-doc at UC Berkeley.

Janet Yellen

Eugene E. and Catherine M. Trefethen Professor Emeritus of Business Administration; Professor Emeritus of Economics

Fields
Macroeconomics and international economics
Current Research
Stabilization policy in the United States and Japan
Current Status
Emeritus
Research Interests
Unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy

Gabriel Zucman

Assistant Professor

Fields
Public economics
Current Status
Teaching
Research Interests
Inequality, wealth, taxation